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Africa University, nearing its 25th Anniversary as a United Methodist school

. 1 min read
An aerial view of Africa University, located in Mutare, Zimbabwe, shows the central area of the campus, with the chapel and library. Photo courtesy of Africa University
AU has a unique vision to build capacity, leadership, sustainability, and peace throughout Africa in the name of Jesus. Check out the full story!

By Jeff Wolfe

Dec. 6, 2016 | (UMNS)
For entities such as the World Intellectual Property Organization, the African Regional Intellectual Property Organization and the Government of Japan, bridging fundamental gaps in development capacity in Africa is equally important and urgent. Currently, those three organizations are collaborating on the provision of scholarships for more than 30 graduate students who will return to their countries as experts in intellectual property rights, patent and copyright protection and policy implementation.  
A newer partnership for Africa University is UNICEF, which is supporting the Masters of Science in Child Rights and Childhood Studies program and providing $400,000 in scholarship funds.

“The benefits of any degree program at Africa U cascade throughout Africa, making the university the training ground for the African continent,” said Dr. Abigail Kangwende, director of the Office of Research and Outreach Programs at Africa University. “This enhances the impact of UNICEF programs in that by putting resources at AU, the impact will be felt throughout the African continent.”
After all, a big part of Africa University’s mission is based on making life better for people across the continent.
“The idea that the experience of the students is a broadening experience, that breaks down stereotypes and distrust,” Stevens said. “It’s a new kind of leadership model that is morally and ethically grounded and more realistic.”