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Churches welcoming refugees in Nigeria

. 1 min read

A woman holds a baby while seated among refugees at the United Methodist Church ATC/Nukkai in Jalingo, Nigeria. United Methodist churches in Nigeria are serving as refugee camps for people displaced after attacks on villages in Lau, a local government area in Taraba State in Northern Nigeria. Photo by the Rev. Ande I. Emmanuel, UMNS.

Photo by the Rev. Ande I. Emmanuel, UMNS
A woman holds a baby while seated among refugees at the United Methodist Church ATC/Nukkai in Jalingo, Nigeria. United Methodist churches in Nigeria are serving as refugee camps for people displaced after attacks on villages in Lau, a local government area in Taraba State in Northern Nigeria.
By the Rev. Ande I. Emmanuel
Feb. 14, 2017 | LAU, Taraba State, Nigeria (UMNS)
United Methodist churches in Nigeria are serving as refugee camps for people displaced after attacks carried out by unknown gunmen in Lau, a local government area in Taraba State in Northern Nigeria. 
The violence is believed by many to be part of a continuing conflict between the Fulani herdsmen and farmers in the Lau areas.
In January, the village of Karim Lazai was burned down, four people were killed and more than 1,700 people, mostly women and children, were forced to flee.
This month, the situation escalated to four more villages and other areas of Lau, bringing the death toll to 15, with more than 200 homes destroyed. The incidents have forced more than 7,000 people to flee their homes and take refuge in various places outside the local government area.
United Methodist churches in ATC/Nukkai, Yelwa Abbare, Jauro Bakari, Lankaviri and Mayodassa have opened their doors to refugees. Connectional Ministries Director Driver Bitrust Jalo said more than 3,500 of the people affected by the attacks are members of The United Methodist Church.