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Exodus and the Sacraments: Font (2)

. 3 min read
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Exodus
and the Sacraments: Font (2)
 
2-3
Sept 2017, Christ Mountain Top
Call
to Worship, Psalm 78, selections (Open Table only)
Children,
John 19.18-37 (especially 33-34)
Message,
Exodus 17.1-7
Mission
Moment: Hurricane relief
Message:
Intro
to this series of messages:
      4 passages in Exodus that are the basis
for extensive NT reflection on the sacraments – Table, Font, Table, Font
      2 are part of the exodus proper
(deliverance from Egypt)
      2 are part of the wilderness experience
Admittedly,
we will be reading these Exodus passages through the lens of the NT, not the
way our Jewish friends read these passages.
Conflict?
      This is “Font 2”
      Paul puts this as part of the Lord’s Table
1
Corinthians 10:1-4
 I do not want you to
be unaware, brothers and sisters, that our ancestors were all under the cloud,
and all passed through the sea,  2
and all were baptized into Moses in the cloud and in the sea,  3 and all ate the same spiritual
food,  4 and all drank the
same spiritual drink. For they drank from the spiritual rock that followed
them, and the rock was Christ.
      Rabbinic tradition: Miriam – a mobile well
that followed Israel
            Water (of life) from a woman
            Birth? Water breaking? John 3, “born
of water & Spirit”
However,
clearly read by Paul in sacramental way
Focus
today is not on what we learn about baptism from this passage, but how we live
a sacramental life
Israel
doesn’t look very good here
But
neither do the Corinthians, and often neither do we
1 Corinthians 10:12  So if you think you are standing, watch out
that you do not fall.

Now,
when a teenager says “I’m starving”, he is failing the test of common sense and
independence.  When a teen stands in
front of the refrigerator and pantry, particularly one full of food, and says,
“There’s nothing to eat”, he is failing the test of common sense and
independence.  After all, if you can’t
feed yourself – even a snack – then you haven’t become nearly as independent as
you think you are, as you think your parents should permit you to be.  (While parents are, as a rule, irrational and
demanding and protective, they actually might understand independence.)
      When a teenager says these things, he – or
she, though I am most familiar with male teens – fails the test.  But, all of us who are parents know, he is
also testing us.  Doesn’t it drive you
nuts when you’ve planned ahead to have peanut butter and jelly, ham and cheese,
that bit of uneaten takeout, and a bowl of leftover spaghetti . . . and the
child stands there expecting you to leap into action, to bow before them and
serve?  “Get it yourself” I say
gruffly.  “Geez.  You must be having a bad day.”  “Bad day, my foot.  It was going just fine until you decided to
test me.”
      Fortunately, God is much more patient with
us than I am with my own kids. Unfortunately, just as our children, as they are
growing up, have a utilitarian view of their parents – a what have you done for
me lately relationship – we live before God with a very similar kind of faith.
      We share in the Table of the Lord,
receiving the bread of heaven and the new covenant in Jesus’ blood. We bear the
watermark of being born of the Spirit.
      But, in the words of Walter Brueggemann,
we “collapse God’s promise into our own well-being and refuse to allow Yahweh
any life apart from our well-being” (NIB, Exodus, 818).
      Salesperson who complained about lack of
success …
Kathy
Mattea (“Standing Knee Deep in a River” [Dying of Thirst])
      They roll by just like water
      and I guess we never learn
      go through life parched and empty
      standing knee deep in a river
      and dying of thirst
Qualification:
Appropriate complaint
      Turn it into prayer: Why? How long?
Pay
attention to the wealth of evidence
      “Is the LORD among us or not?” (17.7)
      We must not forget what God did for us
yesterday
Grace:
Christ
died for us even when we weren’t being particularly loveable
      Romans 5.8
      parents still feed their kids when they
whine
            Not under the illusion that we are
always loveable
            But the truth is that we are always
loved
Resource:

      New Interpreter’s Bible, Exodus,
Brueggemann