You've successfully subscribed to With Christ on the Mountain Top
Great! Next, complete checkout for full access to With Christ on the Mountain Top
Welcome back! You've successfully signed in.
Success! Your account is fully activated, you now have access to all content.
Success! Your billing info is updated.
Billing info update failed.

ReThink Easter: In the Night My Hope Lives On

. 3 min read


Some problems with the video, but most of it can be heard.

ReThink Easter: In the Night My
Hope Lives On
 
2016/03/27 Christ Church,
Mountain Top, Easter, Lord’s Table
Call to Worship, Psalm 118,
selections
Children, John
20.1-18
Message, Luke 24.13-49
Resurrection is TOUGH material!
      For
some, Resurrection belongs to the same conceptual category as an egg-laying
bunny or a calcium-crazed pixie.
      For
others, Resurrection conjures up memories of wishful thinking, overly happy
people who are ignorant of reality and who rabidly squash dissenting views of
their distorted magical world.
The fact is that resurrection was
given to people who did not expect it, were not looking for it, and did not –
at first – believe what they experienced: “How foolish you are, and how slow of
heart to believe” (Luke 24.25). Later in the story, “In their joy they were
disbelieving and still wondering” (24.41).
      The
fact is that resurrection was given to people in their darkest night. Luke’s
version of the Easter Sunday morning story has angels asking the women, “Why do
you look for the living among the dead?” (24.5). Simple answer: Because we
aren’t looking for a living person, but a dead person. We are here to grieve.
Little did they know ….
Wednesday, my first run in a very
long time
      Occasional
surprise of the 25-year-old hotshot
      Comeback
player of the year, down but not out
      Story
that hints at Resurrection
We love stories that hint at
Resurrection because we crave Resurrection itself.
      Crave
it like the Looney Toons craved a drink from “Michael [Jordan]’s Secret Stuff”
in the Space Jam movie.
 

How much I need this message
series
      Dad’s
illness
      So
much I do not understand
      I
crave the story and promise of Resurrection
The problem of receiving the
story and promise of Resurrection: Perceptions hard wired – did not recognize
Jesus
      Mary,
thinking he was the gardener
      Emmaus
Road disciples, thinking he is an out of town traveler
Was he in disguise? Was he not
recognizable in some way?
      Luke
offers two resources to break through our perceptions – Word and Table. In the
church, the official label or our worship services is “A Service of Word and
Table”. Luke is very conscious in this chapter to place the recognition of
Jesus within the context of the worship of the primitive church. Jesus says,
“Peace be with you” when he greets his friends, a greeting that many churches
still use today.
      This
section of Luke 24 has two stories. In the first one, the two disciples on the
Emmaus Road, Jesus begins by discussing Scripture with them and finishes as
they sit around the table. In the second one, the disciples gathered in the
upper room, he begins around the table (eating fish) and finishes by discussing
Scripture. Word and Table, Table and Word break through our perceptive barrier
and allow us to meet Jesus.
“Were not our hearts burning
within us … while he was opening the Scriptures to us?” (24.32)
      Lazarus
and a Rich Man – they will surely believe if someone rises from the dead …
Abraham, if they do not believe Moses and the prophets, they will not believe
if someone rises from the dead
      “If
they do not listen to Moses and the prophets, neither will they be convinced
even if someone rises from the dead” (16.31).
      Scripture’s
power is not so much that it is persuasive, but that it captures our
imagination and changes the way we perceive. So, if you are struggling to
receive the story and promise of Resurrection, place yourself “under the
influence” of Scripture and let it have its way with you.
Recognized in the breaking of the
bread
      Take,
bless, break, give
      Feeding
of the multitude, Last Supper
      Memory
of ritual motion and ritual words
            Not
so much mumbo jumbo
            Carroll,
reciting the words, entering the story
      Jesus
became the Host at the meal, not simply the Guest

      That’s
what happens when we invite Jesus into our lives … he turns tables, takes over.
Sit down with Jesus at the table – he invites you today – and receive the
broken body, the poured out blood of he who died and yet lives.